NBA teams’ spending efficiency: dollars over salary floor per win

Recently, I published my third annual spending efficiency report for each NBA team, measuring each franchise’s “dollars per win” in the 2015-16 season. One interesting comment I received was that the analysis would be more informative if instead of dollars per win, it was “dollars over the salary floor” per win. Only one team (the Trail Blazers) was below the salary floor, and they still managed to make the playoffs, so they would end up … Continue reading

Measuring the spending of NBA teams in 2015-16: dollars per win

I don’t write about the NBA often, especially about things other than the Philadelphia 76ers, but when I do, it’s mostly about analytics. That’s what my annual “dollars per win” pieces are about. If you’re unfamiliar with these pieces, my article on the 2013-14 season is here and the one on the 2014-15 season is here. The last two years, I calculated each team’s dollars/win at the all-star break as well as the end of the … Continue reading

Measuring the spending of NBA teams in 2014-15: dollars per win (end of year edition)

The playoffs are already in full swing, but let’s take a break from the action and take a look at how efficient NBA teams were at spending this year. As I did last year and at the All-Star break this year, I measured the spending of NBA teams by calculating their dollars per win. After updating all the teams’ win totals and salaries, I recalculated their dollars per win to determine how they did by the … Continue reading

Measuring the spending of NBA teams in 2014-15: dollars per win

To some teams, spending more money means a higher chance that the team will win more games. In other sports, this has proven to sometimes be true and sometimes be false. The NBA is not exempt from this. Last year, the Knicks and Nets had two of the highest payrolls in the league, but were both average or worse as a team. Plus, they were in the eastern conference, which has been very weak in … Continue reading

Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (2014)

Every year that passes proves that the game of American football is becoming more and more of a quarterback’s game. They have always been the clear leader on the offense (and sometimes the whole team), but quarterbacks have become more and more important to a team’s success and production. Teams are recognizing that and paying their quarterbacks accordingly though. The point is, it’s getting out of control. This is my second annual installment of the … Continue reading

2014: Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (part six)

There’s also a small list of starters in this group who are getting underpaid for their performance. And when I say small list, I mean it’s just one person: Colin Kaepernick. The genius thing about his contract is that he will probably never be overpaid in his career. He just signed a new contract this offseason for $114 million. My first reaction was that that was absolutely ridiculous. But then I looked at the details … Continue reading

2014: Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (part five)

Ryan Tannehill is going to be the starting QB in Miami, yet he’s not the highest paid QB on the roster this year; it’s Matt Moore. Tannehill is still on his rookie contract, and Moore is going into this season with a $5.5 million cap hit. And he’s a backup. Last year he played just a small portion of one game and managed to throw two picks and fumble. That’s atrocious. He’s only had one … Continue reading

2014: Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (part four)

Joe Flacco is one of the most consistent QBs in the league. He’s never missed a game in his career and has almost always thrown between 3,600 and 3,900 yards in a season. He throws an average of 20 TDs per season and, until last year, about 11 picks per season. Consistency is usually good because you know what’s expected. He has an excellent playoff record and has already won a Super Bowl ring. But … Continue reading

2014: Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (part three)

Now, let’s start looking at some individual players to determine whether or not they deserve their contract. I think the best example to start with is Jay Cutler, QB for the Bears. Cutler’s cap hit and cash earnings more than doubled from the year before. He has the highest cap hit among QBs in the league at $22.5 million. This honestly doesn’t make any sense at all. Once again, Cutler was unable to finish a … Continue reading

2014: Do NFL QBs really deserve their contracts? (part two)

As I mentioned last year, there are four main ways to judge a QB (in my opinion): stats, regular season wins, postseason wins, and Super Bowl rings. Some players have one or more of these categories, and some have none. Some guys have all of them. If a player has all of them, then he basically deserves the maximum amount of money because he’s an elite QB. If a QB doesn’t have any of them, … Continue reading